Wednesday, 22 October 2014

Guest blog: Alan Jones, author of ‘Blue Wicked’

I’ve just published my second book, ‘Blue Wicked’, for Kindle and on Smashwords, a year after publishing my first book, ‘The Cabinetmaker’. Both are gritty Glasgow crime stories, although the second one has more violence, and is not for the faint-hearted, as one reviewer commented. 
When I published The Cabinetmaker on Kindle in 2013, it got generally good reviews, although there was a significant amount of feedback suggesting that it maybe wandered a little for some readers and that there was a bit too much cabinetmaking and football content, which distracted a little from the central story. Then I got my first 3-star review, from one of the book blogging sites, Big Al’s books and pals. Keith Nixon, author of ‘The Fix’, said the book was ‘promising’ when he reviewed it but also gave it a bit of a pasting on the editorial front. Difficult to take, in a way, but I came to the conclusion that he was right, and that when I was writing my next book, I  would use the feedback from the first one to improve my writing, and also employ a freelance editor to make it error free.
I contacted Keith, and he couldn’t have been more helpful, suggesting a couple of editors that I could use, and when I emailed Julie Lewthwaite, she offered to edit a sample of the book to show me what she could do for me. I was pleased with the result and sent her the whole manuscript, which was very promptly returned to me covered in a mass of electronic red ink! And she told me I used too many adverbs!
I accepted all of her typo, punctuation and grammar corrections and 90% of her style and content suggestions. Even when I didn’t agree with her changes, her comments made me think of alternatives. I also removed a pile of unnecessary adverbs, and re-wrote one complete section on her advice. After she’d checked it again and we’d had another couple of rounds of polishing it, I felt that the process had been well worthwhile and anyway, the costs had been covered by the income from the moderate sales of ‘The Cabinetmaker’. The result, I hope, is a more focussed and pithy book with less distractions.
As the acid test, I sent ‘Blue Wicked’ to Keith Nixon, and this time he found no fault with the book, and gave it a 5-star rating. 
At some point, I’m going to go back and have a final go at re-editing The Cabinetmaker, and I’ll get Julie to do her stuff as well. I also have another book in the pipeline, and rough plots for a few more books after that. I love writing, and the beauty of it is that you can do it anywhere. About a third of ‘Blue Wicked’ was written on the iPad, on holiday, and also during the odd insomniac hour or two I sometimes have in the middle of the night. 
The other useful skill I forced myself to learn was to touch-type. I still ain’t fast, but I can watch the screen as I type, which really aids the writing process. I would advise anyone starting to write to do this as quickly as possible, and I wish I’d done it sooner.
'Blue Wicked' is a Gritty thriller set in the south side of Glasgow. Eddie Henderson finds himself as the unlikely investigator holding information that there's a serial killer targeting the substance dependent underclass that inhabits the notorious Glasgow housing estates. The police ignore his warnings but one young detective constable believes him and she helps him search for the truth, despite putting her own career at risk. Their desperate search for the killer eventually sparks off a massive manhunt, with Eddie and Catherine, the young detective, at the forefront of the investigation. The book contains a fair bit of strong language and Glasgow dialect, and has some very violent passages. 
I've been writing since 2003. I was born in Glasgow in 1960 and spent the first twenty-three years of my life there, but now live and work on the Ayrshire coast, in the animal health sector. I'm married with four grown up children and in my spare time I read, sail, make furniture, play football and watch films when I'm not writing.